in the good old days … #13TH

Trump’s rallies are frequently hotbeds of racism, misogyny, Islamophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment. His supporters have threatened journalists and assaulted protesters on multiple occasions.
Trump himself has encouraged
this bloodthirsty rage by reminiscing about the “good old days” when protesters and outsiders at political events could expect to be “roughed up,” and perhaps even leave “on a stretcher.” The nominee at one point also promised to pay the legal fees of anyone who’d violently assault protesters at his events. (He later backtracked and claimed he’d never said that.)
What we’re seeing today has its roots in one of the darkest chapters in the nation’s history. This clip should not only scare you ― it should remind you of how much work there’s left to do in the struggle for civil rights.
“13TH,” directed by the renowned documentary filmmaker Ava DuVernay, takes its title from the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which outlawed slavery after the Civil War.
DuVernay’s film zeroes in on
a particular 13-word section of the amendment that permits involuntary servitude “as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.” From this clause, “13TH” draws a direct line to the mass incarceration crisis facing the country today. “13TH” is available for streaming on Netflix.

Christina Wilkie National Political Reporter, The Huffington Post

NOTE: There are many parallels in the Tea Party/Trump movement to the fictional events described in Orwell’s “1984.” The most obvious have to do with the deliberate degradation of language in order to influence behavior and thinking. But one similarity, perhaps less noticed, is the “two minutes hate” in which the Party forces people to watch a TV program that pours invective on the supposed leader of the attempt to overthrow the party, rousing them to angry shouting. You only have to look at people at Trump rallies shouting, “Lock her up,” to see hatred manifested by Trump’s provocative language.               

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